Category Archives: Culture

Sunflowers for Mothers

Happy Mothers Day from Leo Art Creations!

See More [Leo Art Creations]

📸 Photography By: Leonor Maya Martinez

🗺 Location: Bedner’s Farm, Boynton Beach, Florida

🎦 Post Production By: R. Michael Brown Writing, Public Relations, & Marketing Consulting

🎵 Music: “Winter Sunlight” by unreal_dm
2009 – Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution (3.0)

#MothersDay #sunflower #sunflowers #sunshine #ArtTalk #photography #video

#MothersDay#sunflower#sunflowers#sunshine#arttalk

What an Olympic Medalist, Homeless in Seattle, Wants You to Know

By Scott Greenstone, Seattle Times staff reporter

When Rebecca Twigg was 7, she rode a bike for the first time. There were no training wheels, but Twigg took off like she’d done it in a previous life. She fell only when she realized she didn’t know how to stop, and steered into a wall.

“I took to the road like I was born to do it,” Twigg says today. “Except for the little part about stopping. I’m not a very good planner.”

The Seattle-raised athlete went on to become one of the most famous American cyclists in the ’80s and ’90s, winning six world championships and medaling in two Olympics. She appeared on cycling magazine covers, in sponsor ads and in features in Sports Illustrated and Vanity Fair.

Rebecca Twigg was the darling of the cycling scene in the 1980’s & 90’s

But then, in 1996, she left the team abruptly during the Olympics and the next year, retired from cycling. She re-entered the workforce. It didn’t work out.

“Once you’ve done something that feels like you’re born to do it, it’s hard to find anything that’s that good of a fit,” Twigg says today. “Anything else that feels that way.”

Rebecca Twigg has now been without a home for almost five years in Seattle, living first with friends and family, then in her car, then in homeless shelters and then, for a night, under garbage bags on the street downtown. She hasn’t had a bike for years, and no one recognizes her anymore, she says.

See More [Seattle Times]

BrownieBytes Take

I was in the US Olympic Cycling Coaching Program in the late 1980’s and early 90’s and met Rebecca once and saw her working out many times in Colorado Springs at the Olympic Training Center. She seemed to be a very dedicated and down-to-earth person. It’s a shame that this has happened to her.

So many athletes put it all on the line with very little financial backing during their amateur athletic career. Once that career is over most don’t have any financial backing and struggle to reinvent themselves. I speak from experience on this, both as a reinvented athlete and coach. Reinvention skills are the key to life.

— R. Michael Brown

Leadership

When you empower under-performing toxic people because they are loyal to you, you erode the respect of your team, disempower your healthy high performers (who will leave) and undermined the mission.

#leadership #ToxicEmployees #HighPerformers #KnowledgeWorkers #mission

A Man Lives in 2 Tiny Houses on a Private Island in Florida

In 2017, Tim Davidson was given 60 days to move out of his family’s vacation home in Florida.

Davidson had been living in the vacation home in Sarasota, Florida, for about a year when his family decided it was finally time for him to get a place of his own.

Initially, Davidson considered buying a traditional-size home.

While he was house hunting, he realized that a large home meant unused space, unnecessary belongings, more taxes, and more money.

Davidson just wanted the necessities: a bedroom, living area, small kitchen, and access to the outdoors.

A tiny home felt like a perfect solution.

BrownieBytes has a question: If he’s on an island, why didn’t he position the houses so he has a water view? Very odd fellow…

— Read on www.insider.com/man-lives-two-tiny-homes-private-island-florida-2021-3

How to Tap Into Emotions and Boost Your Content Marketing

Making a purchase is 85% emotional and 15% logical – this article breaks down how you can use content marketing to tap into your customers’ emotions.

Emotions are an integral part of our everyday life. So if you have chosen the work as a content marketer you need to know how to discover these emotions, and uncover their raw ingredients. Embrace them, dig deeper and offer a way out the other side.

We are always trying to understand why some content goes viral and rises to the top – and some flops. Up until now we have focused on the content itself – optimizing it for search and sharing, then desperately hoping it will get some attention.

But what about your readers’ emotional needs? The sense of belonging, ego, self-expression and obligation. There are ways to “tap” into these emotions and they should be a part of every content marketing strategy.

You have about 2 seconds to get people’s attention – that’s your first couple of sentences. My hope, for example, is that you were drawn in by my first sentence and lured down the page. Now, the rest of my job is to engage you, to continue to feed your emotions, and move you along in two ways:

  1. If the goal is increased brand awareness, relationship building, and sharing of valuable and practical information, then I am looking to compel and engage the emotions of my readers to the extent that they will want to share.
  2. If the goal is moving the visitor into the next phase toward a purchase, I will be using sales psychology and neuroscience to stimulate the emotional responses necessary to achieve certain actions (solving his/her problem or relieving the pain through purchasing the product or service I am selling).

— Read on www.jeffbullas.com/tap-emotions-boost-content-marketing/

Ex-Google Employees Build New Search Engine Down The Road From Google

Neeva Home Page Image

By Rebekah Dunne

You may have read about the social media platform built for good recently; well, how do you feel about a search engine created for privacy?

Sure, you have the likes of DuckDuckGo that offers additional privacy protections, and Mozilla Firefox, which has built-in cookie jars to prevent third parties from sharing your information, but this particular search engine is offering something that no other platform does.

Neeva is dedicated and extremely strict about operating its platform without ads.

“Search is the gateway to the world’s information, and with Neeva, we want to help you experience the Internet in a new way—free of distractions, prying eyes and frustration.”

BrownieBytes has a Question: Are you willing to pay $5-$10 a month for a subscription?

R. Michael Brown

The brand wants its users to see search results that aren’t dictated by advertisers.

So, if Neeva has ditched the ads, how is the search engine made available? The platform will operate on a subscription basis, costing users between $5-10 per month.

See More [SEJ Search Engine Journal

Article Table of Contents

  1. Built And Run By Ex-Googlers
  2. How Does Neeva Work?
  3. What Data Does Neeva Collect?
  4. How Does Neeva Use This information?
  5. So, How Is This Different?
  6. How Is This Different To Google?
  7. Do We Need Another Search Engine?
  8. Citations

Neeva isn’t available yet but you can check it out.

Explore Neeva and join their waitlist

Let BrownieBytes know what you think in the comments!

Subscribe to BrownieBytes for the latest in interesting and informative topics by going to the sidebar on the right and click Follow Brownie Bytes or Subscribe by Email.

Homebuyers Are Heading to Florida During Covid, but Nearly as Many Are Moving Out – WSJ

By Candace Taylor

Thanks to hurricanes, heat and red-hot home prices, the state’s population growth hit its lowest rate since 2014 during the pandemic.

David Gewirtz never got used to the heat, even after 15 years in Florida.

Still, Mr. Gewirtz, who grew up in New Jersey, and his wife, Denise Amrich, liked their adopted hometown of Palm Bay, Fla., and probably would have stayed if it weren’t for the “brutal” hurricanes.

“Staring at those tracker maps for weeks before a hurricane hits starts to create a stress level,” said Mr. Gewirtz, a technology columnist in his early 50s. “It’s three weeks of wondering whether you’re going to have a house at the end.”

The couple evacuated their home in the path of 2017’s Hurricane Irma, kept driving until they got to Oregon and decided to stay.

— Read on www.wsj.com/articles/people-moving-to-florida-during-covid-11615463911

Finally Got Back on the Road Bike Today after Years of Riding the Fat Tire Bike

Freelance writer R. Michael Brown started riding his road bicycle again.

By R. Michael Brown, Marketing Consultant & Freelance Writer

Even though I have over 150,000 miles riding a road bike. my Specialized was like riding a foreign ice skate. Took over 30 minutes before I got comfortable on it again.

Had it refurbished with new wheels and tires, new handlebar tape and tuned up by Bicycle World Lake Worth.

Freelance writer R. Michael Brown's Fat Tire bicycle.
Retiring the Fat Tire for now. Back on the road.

They did a great job and ran info a familiar face, Jeffrey Langlois, a former photojournalist at the Palm Beach Daily News. We covered a lot of the same stories in the Town of Palm Beach. Small world.

So I’ll be riding that road bike again, hopefully a lot. Need the exercise.

The Rise and Fall of the Cruise Industry

Cruise ships are scrapped and dismantled in an industry that's in a declining free fall.

By Robert Leslie , Noah Lewis , and Claire Price

Until COVID-19 hit, the global cruise industry was on course for a record-breaking year. But major coronavirus outbreaks on board ships cost lives, jobs, and damaged the reputation of the fastest-growing sector of the travel industry.

See More [Business Insider]

James Patterson’s Writing Started as a Side Hustle — Now He’s One of the World’s Highest Paid Authors

James Patterson at play in his home in the Town of Palm Beach, Florida
James Patterson at home in the Town of Palm Beach, Florida

By Jade Scipioni

At 73, James Patterson has sold more than 425 million copies of his 200 novels globally, making him one of the highest paid authors in the world.

Patterson had annual earnings topping more than $80 million between June 2019 to June 2020 and sold nearly 5 million in books in the U.S. during that time, according to Forbes.

In July, Patterson signed a multi-project deal with Amazon’s Audible for an undisclosed amount, with his first Audible Original, “The Coldest Case” out Thursday.

“I do not work for a living, I play for a living. I love doing it,” Patterson tells CNBC Make It.

But Patterson’s road to success didn’t happen overnight. He started writing as a side hustle and he faced a lot of rejection before getting his first book published.

See More [CNBC]