Category Archives: Science

Fire-Fighting Rescue

This is the Colossus, a robust fire-fighting robot by Shark Robotics that was developed with Paris firemen, the Brigade de Sapeurs-Pompiers. This multi-purpose support robot for operations in high-risk areas helped extinguish the ferocious Notre Dame blaze that occurred on April 15, 2019.

While it may seem small in size, this fire-fighting beast lives up to its name. Considered to be “the most powerful electric robot in the world,” the Colossus is amazingly resistant to thermal radiation (up to 900 ° C). It can also run up to 12 hours in an operational situation and has a carrying capacity of up to 500 Kg.

Its integration is also impressive. In less than 30 seconds, the Colossus’ functions are interchangeable by a single operator without the use of tools. Super easy to use, the Colossus sets up quickly and is a low-maintenance robot that has proven to save lives as well as beloved historic structures.

— Read on www.techthatmatters.com/category/rescue/

We Finally Know How Much Radiation There Is on The Moon, And It’s Not Great News

As the US prepares to return humans to the Moon this decade, one of the biggest dangers future astronauts will face is space radiation that can cause lasting health effects, from cataracts to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

Though the Apollo missions of the 1960s and 1970s proved it was safe for people to spend a few days on the lunar surface, NASA did not take daily radiation measurements that would help scientists quantify just how long crews could stay.

This question was resolved Friday after a Chinese-German team published in the journal Science Advances the results of an experiment carried out by China’s Chang’E 4 lander in 2019.

“The radiation of the Moon is between two and three times higher than what you have on the ISS (International Space Station),” co-author Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, an astrophysicist at the University of Kiel told AFP.

“So that limits your stay to approximately two months on the surface of the Moon,” he added, once the radiation exposure from the roughly week-long journey there, and week back, is taken into account.

See More (Science Alert):

https://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-predict-how-long-humans-can-survive-radiation-on-the-moon

This ‘DroneGun’ Takes Down Unwanted Drones with Radio Frequencies Instead of Bullets

This is the DroneGun Tactical made by Droneshield that provides a safe countermeasure against a wide array of drone models. The DroneGun takes down unwanted drones by shooting radio frequencies instead of bullets. It’s a one-man operated rifle used as a military defense that has an effective range of one mile.

The battery-powered, single-rifle DroneGun allows for controlled management of explosive-carrying drones without damaging common drone models or the surrounding environment.
— Read on www.techthatmatters.com/this-dronegun-takes-down-unwanted-drones-with-radio-frequencies-instead-of-bullets/

Team Creates Accurate Great Hammerhead 3D Model and Brings the Shark Nemesis to Life

nemesis-3d-model-mesh

Meet Nemesis, one of the many endangered great hammerhead sharks that spends her winters in Bimini, The Bahamas. This interactive 3D project was a close collaboration between Angela Rosenberg, President of ANGARI Foundation and Captain of R/V ANGARI, Duncan Irschick, Professor at UMass Amherst and Director of Digital Life with CG artist Jeremy Bot and Casey Sapp, CEO of VRTUL.

Footage was collected during R/V ANGARI’s Expedition 33 in Bimini with Casey Sapp’s custom underwater multi-camera system to collect views of Nemesis swimming from all angles. The videos provided Digital Life modelers with the necessary imagery and data to create a high resolution and accurate animated 3D model.

The completed interactive 3D shark model is part of Digital Life’s “ark” of living organisms, which serves as an invaluable resource for educators, scientists and conservationists.

This work would not have been possible without the financial and field support of several donors.

See More [ANGARI News]

This Airplane Disinfecting Device Is the Germ Killer of the Skies

This is the GermFalcon airplane disinfection system by Dimer UVC Innovations that uses Ultra-violet “C” light (UVC) to instantly kill 99.99% of bacteria, viruses, and superbugs on any exposed surface. The process is efficient, affordable, and highly-effective especially in hard-to-reach areas on a plane. Plus, it sanitizes all surfaces without any toxic after-effects, unlike chemical disinfectants.

On average, it takes about a minute to sanitize a single-seat using a chemical disinfectant, but the GermFalcon can treat 54 seats in that same minute. To further this point, it can take over two hours to disinfect the surface of a narrow-body jet, but the GermFalcon’s UVC system could do it in less than 10 minutes.
— Read on www.techthatmatters.com/this-airplane-disinfecting-device-is-the-germ-killer-of-the-skies/

Great Barrier Reef showing small signs of recovery says new report – ANGARI Foundation

The world’s most famous coral reef is showing signs of recovery.

The Great Barrier Reef is a huge area of living coral off the coast of Australia, which is home to thousands of species of plants and animals.

It’s so big it can even be seen from space, and is protected with World Heritage status for its “enormous scientific and intrinsic importance”.
— Read on angari.org/great-barrier-reef-showing-small-signs-of-recovery-says-new-report/

Deep

Started reading “Deep.” A birthday present from Patrick Brown

It’s stories about freediving: No fins, scuba, nothing. Not 20’ deep either. Hundreds! Their bodies actually change from the pressure. Stay tuned for updates as I’m reading.

“They freedive because it’s the most direct and intimate way to connect with the ocean. During that three minutes beneath the surface (the average time it takes to dive a few hundred feet), the body bears only a passing resemblance to its terrestrial form and function. The ocean changes us physically, and psychically.”

Excerpt From

Deep

James Nestor

https://books.apple.com/us/book/deep/id678303066

Nonprofit Supports Marine Science and Unites Scientists with Community – ANGARI Foundation

For many marine scientists, at-sea fieldwork is an important part of their research. Some researchers claim they spend as much as 70% of their job aboard research vessels to collect samples and run field experiments. While working on the water may sound glamorous to many, the reality is that working from a research vessel usually consists of long days of hard work, and is most often extremely expensive.

ANGARI Foundation, a nonprofit organization headquartered in West Palm Beach, Florida, offers a unique opportunity for scientists and filmmakers who require working on the water. The luxury research vessel ANGARI, captained by the foundation’s co-founder and president, Angela Rosenberg, is offered for charter at a minimal cost.
— Read on angari.org/nonprofit-supports-marine-science-and-unites-scientists-with-community/

100-pound Suwanee alligator snapping turtle

FWC documents 100-pound Suwanee alligator snapping turtle – ABC7 Southwest Florida

The fierce-looking turtles were found along the New River, a blackwater stream with low biological productivity, according to the FWC. They say finding species this large in such a small body of water is unusual.

— Read on abc-7.com/news/science/2020/08/21/fwc-documents-100-pound-suwanee-alligator-snapping-turtle/

Boogaali | The Ugandan Company that’s Making Affordable & Sustainable Bicycles Out of Bamboo

It’s in his workshop, in the capital city of Kampala, that young Ugandan entrepreneur Noordin Kasoma designs bicycles made from bamboo. His company, Boogaali Bicycles limited, produces bicycles that are, not only affordable but also sustainable.

In an industry dominated by steel and aluminium, the use of bamboo is not as bizarre as it might seem. Kasoma says his bikes are strong, light and durable. They are also comfortable, he says.

Boogaali-Bamboo Bikes

Boogaali-Bamboo Bikes

“The bamboo itself tries to absorb the shocks that you are passing through, better than steel or aluminium.”

Bamboo frames aren’t uncommon in the cycling world. Noordin’s bicycles, however, come with a Ugandan spin: the joints are reinforced with bark cloth, a traditional clothing material extracted from the inner bark of the Mutuba tree.

In addition to being hand-crafted, the Boogaali bamboo bicycles are customized according to the cyclist’s needs and specifications.