Category Archives: Marine Biology

Great Barrier Reef showing small signs of recovery says new report – ANGARI Foundation

The world’s most famous coral reef is showing signs of recovery.

The Great Barrier Reef is a huge area of living coral off the coast of Australia, which is home to thousands of species of plants and animals.

It’s so big it can even be seen from space, and is protected with World Heritage status for its “enormous scientific and intrinsic importance”.
— Read on angari.org/great-barrier-reef-showing-small-signs-of-recovery-says-new-report/

Nonprofit Supports Marine Science and Unites Scientists with Community – ANGARI Foundation

For many marine scientists, at-sea fieldwork is an important part of their research. Some researchers claim they spend as much as 70% of their job aboard research vessels to collect samples and run field experiments. While working on the water may sound glamorous to many, the reality is that working from a research vessel usually consists of long days of hard work, and is most often extremely expensive.

ANGARI Foundation, a nonprofit organization headquartered in West Palm Beach, Florida, offers a unique opportunity for scientists and filmmakers who require working on the water. The luxury research vessel ANGARI, captained by the foundation’s co-founder and president, Angela Rosenberg, is offered for charter at a minimal cost.
— Read on angari.org/nonprofit-supports-marine-science-and-unites-scientists-with-community/

100-pound Suwanee alligator snapping turtle

FWC documents 100-pound Suwanee alligator snapping turtle – ABC7 Southwest Florida

The fierce-looking turtles were found along the New River, a blackwater stream with low biological productivity, according to the FWC. They say finding species this large in such a small body of water is unusual.

— Read on abc-7.com/news/science/2020/08/21/fwc-documents-100-pound-suwanee-alligator-snapping-turtle/

Biscayne Bay fish kill is a warning sign, researcher says

Researchers set out Wednesday to survey Biscayne Bay between the 79th Street and Julia Tuttle Causeways, where dead fish were seen bobbing along the surface.

FIU’s autonomous surface vessel surveys Biscayne Bay near Morningside Park.

“It is an emergency. The bay is not in a good place right now,” said Piero Gardinali, a chemistry professor who is director of the institute’s Freshwater Resources Division. “It’s a warning sign more than anything else. People have been predicting that things like this could happen. I think it’s time for us to sit at the table and say ‘OK, let’s do something about it.’”

Researchers believe fish were killed when the bay’s saltwater became so hot, it could no longer retain oxygen in the amounts necessary for marine life to thrive.

They are using an autonomous surface vehicle equipped with sensors to measure temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and chlorophyll, which can be an indicator for algae. What they find could provide more details on the health of the bay. The vessel allows researchers to collect more data over a larger area.

https://news.fiu.edu/2020/biscayne-bay-fish-kill-is-a-warning-sign-researcher-says?utm_source=tag&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=newsroom-referrals&utm_term=CREST%20Center%20for%20Aquatic%20Chemistry%20and%20the%20Environment