What an Olympic Medalist, Homeless in Seattle, Wants You to Know

By Scott Greenstone, Seattle Times staff reporter

When Rebecca Twigg was 7, she rode a bike for the first time. There were no training wheels, but Twigg took off like she’d done it in a previous life. She fell only when she realized she didn’t know how to stop, and steered into a wall.

“I took to the road like I was born to do it,” Twigg says today. “Except for the little part about stopping. I’m not a very good planner.”

The Seattle-raised athlete went on to become one of the most famous American cyclists in the ’80s and ’90s, winning six world championships and medaling in two Olympics. She appeared on cycling magazine covers, in sponsor ads and in features in Sports Illustrated and Vanity Fair.

Rebecca Twigg was the darling of the cycling scene in the 1980’s & 90’s

But then, in 1996, she left the team abruptly during the Olympics and the next year, retired from cycling. She re-entered the workforce. It didn’t work out.

“Once you’ve done something that feels like you’re born to do it, it’s hard to find anything that’s that good of a fit,” Twigg says today. “Anything else that feels that way.”

Rebecca Twigg has now been without a home for almost five years in Seattle, living first with friends and family, then in her car, then in homeless shelters and then, for a night, under garbage bags on the street downtown. She hasn’t had a bike for years, and no one recognizes her anymore, she says.

See More [Seattle Times]

BrownieBytes Take

I was in the US Olympic Cycling Coaching Program in the late 1980’s and early 90’s and met Rebecca once and saw her working out many times in Colorado Springs at the Olympic Training Center. She seemed to be a very dedicated and down-to-earth person. It’s a shame that this has happened to her.

So many athletes put it all on the line with very little financial backing during their amateur athletic career. Once that career is over most don’t have any financial backing and struggle to reinvent themselves. I speak from experience on this, both as a reinvented athlete and coach. Reinvention skills are the key to life.

— R. Michael Brown

Brand Storytelling LinkedIn Group Reaches 8,000 Members

By R. Michael Brown

Sound ON!

Congratulations for topping 8,000 members today in the #BrandStorytelling #LinkedIn Group I founded.

Brand Storytelling and Journalism in a hot topic now for public relations and marketing.

Join us! [LinkedIn Group: Brand Storytelling & Journalism]

BrandJournalism #CorporateCommunications #PublicRelations #marketing #MarketingCommunication

Apple’s new privacy feature will change the web. And not everyone is happy about it.

📸: Jimmy Benson

With iOS 14.5, Apple has introduced some new privacy features that will limit targeted advertising.

By Daphne Leprince-Ringuet
📸: Jimmy Benson

Ever been spammed with sportswear adverts after looking up gym membership fees, or been bombarded with tempting hotel discounts upon booking flights for your next getaway?

These sort of adverts, almost eerie in how relevant they are to users’ interests, are now a common part of our experience of using apps and the web. But with the new release of iOS 14.5, and with it a new feature called App Tracking Transparency (ATT), these ads might now become less of a common sight.

The Cupertino giant, in effect, is introducing some limitations to the data collection practices that constitute the bread-and-butter of creepy targeted advertising arising from our use of apps.

ATT was confirmed earlier this year, and it is a major blow to most modern-day online advertising strategies. The feature requires apps to get users’ permission before tracking their data across other companies’ apps or websites for advertising purposes.

In other words, if users decide to select “Ask app not to track,” then the app’s developers will not be allowed to collect data about users’ behavior outside of the services provided on their own platform.

See More [ZDNet]

How To Build A Digital Marketing Strategy For Businesses Targeting Growth In 2021

For businesses new to digital marketing, these steps may feel huge to begin with, but once you get the hang of it, it will seem as natural as wearing a seatbelt in a car.

Now is the time, more than ever, to master your digital marketing strategy to get your business in front of more eyes. But strap yourself in for a journey rather than a two-stop trip—digital marketing is not a one-off effort, but rather an ongoing objective that needs daily monitoring. 

— Read on www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2021/04/05/how-to-build-a-digital-marketing-strategy-for-businesses-targeting-growth-in-2021/

Leadership

When you empower under-performing toxic people because they are loyal to you, you erode the respect of your team, disempower your healthy high performers (who will leave) and undermined the mission.

#leadership #ToxicEmployees #HighPerformers #KnowledgeWorkers #mission

April is ‘Military Brat’ Month – Let’s Honor Them

By R. Michael Brown, Marketing Consultant, Freelance Writer & Military Brat

April was designated as a recognition month for children of U.S. military service members that grew up in the military, moving from base to base, all over the world. Military brats are different from their civilian counterparts.

Imagine:

  • Having to change countries, states, schools, athletic teams, friends, and your house every three to four years while you’re trying to be a kid?
  • Watching your parent deploy for months at a time, sometimes not even knowing where they are going because it’s a secret. But often you know it’s to a dangerous place, including war zones.
  • Waiting for and reuniting with your deployed parent, usually at the flight line (military airport), over and over again. Each time you hope they get off the plane.
  • Keeping few material possessions because when you move a lot, you can’t have a lot. You live “light.”
  • Caring for a wounded warrior, your parent, that was hurt, possibly for life, while in action.
  • Living in base housing or just off-base and hoping and praying the military staff car doesn’t stop at your house with a military chaplain and officer to inform you that your parent is missing-in-action (MIA), a prisoner-of-war (POW), or killed-in-action (KIA).

Anyone that says that the children don’t serve in the military, along with their parents, don’t know what they are talking about. These kids also sacrifice for their country as their parents serve.

Over 2 million US military brat children have had a parent deployed since 9/11. Half of them have experienced two or more deployments.

The term “military brat” is a badge of pride worn by generations of kids who traveled the world with their parents, moving into adulthood with the knowledge that they have the strength to handle anything. They are fiercely patriotic.

Military brats naturally develop organic strategies and tactics to deal with their situation. It makes them:

Brave
Resilient
Adaptable
Tenacious

A BRAT.

So this month I’ll be honoring the military brat. Hope you follow along and honor them too.

Please share this post…

The Radioactive Diamond Battery That Will Run For 28,000 Years

BY CAROLINE DELBERT

It’s powered by nuclear waste, but still safe for humans.

In two years, one startup says you’ll be able to buy its diamond nuclear-powered battery. Even cooler: The battery will last for up to 28,000 years.

We know—that sounds wild. The potential game-changer comes from the U.S. startup NDB, which stands for Nano Diamond Battery, a “high-power diamond-based alpha, beta, and neutron voltaic battery” its research scientist founders say can give devices “life-long and green energy.”

Could NDB’s bold claim actually become a reality?

To build its nano diamond battery, NDB combines radioactive isotopes from nuclear waste with layers of paneled nano diamonds. Diamonds are a rare thing to begin with, but they are extremely good heat conductance makes them even more unusual in the realm of construction of devices. Micro-sized single crystal diamonds move heat away from the radioactive isotope materials so quickly that the transaction generates electricity.

Scientists presented the first known diamond nuclear voltaic (DNV) battery concept using waste graphite from a graphite-cooled nuclear reactor. The radioactively contaminated graphite could last thousands of years, with the heat-conducting diamonds pulling that energy away into electricity alongside it the whole time. NDB’s concept is the same, but with layers and layers of the diamond and radioactive waste panels to equal higher total amounts of energy.

You’re probably wondering what the catch is.

See More [Popular Mechanics]

Travel Inspired Painting

Country Road by Leo Art Creations

Painting landscapes is how I started. At first I was inspired by my world-wide travel for my job.

But since I started painting, inspiration comes from so many unique places. I’ve learned that creating art on a regular basis causes you to see things differently.

See More [Leo Art Creations]

A Man Lives in 2 Tiny Houses on a Private Island in Florida

In 2017, Tim Davidson was given 60 days to move out of his family’s vacation home in Florida.

Davidson had been living in the vacation home in Sarasota, Florida, for about a year when his family decided it was finally time for him to get a place of his own.

Initially, Davidson considered buying a traditional-size home.

While he was house hunting, he realized that a large home meant unused space, unnecessary belongings, more taxes, and more money.

Davidson just wanted the necessities: a bedroom, living area, small kitchen, and access to the outdoors.

A tiny home felt like a perfect solution.

BrownieBytes has a question: If he’s on an island, why didn’t he position the houses so he has a water view? Very odd fellow…

— Read on www.insider.com/man-lives-two-tiny-homes-private-island-florida-2021-3