Category Archives: Environment

Sustainable Deepwater Fish Farms Breed ‘Sushi-Grade Fish’ and Could Replenish Depleted Wild Stocks

Sustainable deepwater fish farms could propel the fishing industry into a new direction and in an “environmentally responsible manner” by replenishing depleted wild stocks that have been affected by overfishing and pollution.

Marine biologist Neil Sims is helping to spearhead this initiative with Hawaii-based Ocean Era (formerly Kampachi Farms), a start-up that’s established offshore.

Ocean Era breeds “sushi-grade fish” in pens 230 feet and almost 4 miles (70 meters deep, 6 km) from the coast. Currently, aquaculture (the farming of fish, seafood and aquatic plants) already accounts for about half the fish eaten worldwide. However, these fish farms are typically located in coastal waters where the fecal waste produced by the fish, and chemicals used in the farming process potentially impacts the environment.
— Read on www.techthatmatters.com/these-sustainable-deepwater-fish-farms-breed-sushi-grade-fish-and-could-replenish-depleted-wild-stocks/

Really 2020? Enough is Enough. Atlantic 5-Day Tropical Weather Outlook

The National Hurricane Center is into Greek names at this point because of so many storms. The latest is Gamma. Come on 2020 – give us a break! Atlantic 5-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook
— Read on www.nhc.noaa.gov/gtwo.php

Team Creates Accurate Great Hammerhead 3D Model and Brings the Shark Nemesis to Life

nemesis-3d-model-mesh

Meet Nemesis, one of the many endangered great hammerhead sharks that spends her winters in Bimini, The Bahamas. This interactive 3D project was a close collaboration between Angela Rosenberg, President of ANGARI Foundation and Captain of R/V ANGARI, Duncan Irschick, Professor at UMass Amherst and Director of Digital Life with CG artist Jeremy Bot and Casey Sapp, CEO of VRTUL.

Footage was collected during R/V ANGARI’s Expedition 33 in Bimini with Casey Sapp’s custom underwater multi-camera system to collect views of Nemesis swimming from all angles. The videos provided Digital Life modelers with the necessary imagery and data to create a high resolution and accurate animated 3D model.

The completed interactive 3D shark model is part of Digital Life’s “ark” of living organisms, which serves as an invaluable resource for educators, scientists and conservationists.

This work would not have been possible without the financial and field support of several donors.

See More [ANGARI News]

Great Barrier Reef showing small signs of recovery says new report – ANGARI Foundation

The world’s most famous coral reef is showing signs of recovery.

The Great Barrier Reef is a huge area of living coral off the coast of Australia, which is home to thousands of species of plants and animals.

It’s so big it can even be seen from space, and is protected with World Heritage status for its “enormous scientific and intrinsic importance”.
— Read on angari.org/great-barrier-reef-showing-small-signs-of-recovery-says-new-report/

Deep

Started reading “Deep.” A birthday present from Patrick Brown

It’s stories about freediving: No fins, scuba, nothing. Not 20’ deep either. Hundreds! Their bodies actually change from the pressure. Stay tuned for updates as I’m reading.

“They freedive because it’s the most direct and intimate way to connect with the ocean. During that three minutes beneath the surface (the average time it takes to dive a few hundred feet), the body bears only a passing resemblance to its terrestrial form and function. The ocean changes us physically, and psychically.”

Excerpt From

Deep

James Nestor

https://books.apple.com/us/book/deep/id678303066

This Self-Sustaining ‘Floating House’ Is Fully Solar-Powered

This is the next-gen floating house by Miami-based Arkup that promotes “avant-garde life on the water.” Equipped with electric propulsion and four hydraulic spuds, Arkup’s houseboat can actually lift itself out of the water – thanks to its customized self-lifting barge and it’s totally stable at anchor.

This 4,350-square foot solar-powered, rainwater-harvesting “mobile floating mansion” takes off-grid, water-based living to another level. Eco-friendly, no fuel, zero-emission, it’s also equipped with purification systems. True to “French art de Vivre, Dutch maritime tradition,” you can be fancy while being safe.
— Read on www.techthatmatters.com/this-self-sustaining-floating-house-is-fully-solar-powered/

Nonprofit Supports Marine Science and Unites Scientists with Community – ANGARI Foundation

For many marine scientists, at-sea fieldwork is an important part of their research. Some researchers claim they spend as much as 70% of their job aboard research vessels to collect samples and run field experiments. While working on the water may sound glamorous to many, the reality is that working from a research vessel usually consists of long days of hard work, and is most often extremely expensive.

ANGARI Foundation, a nonprofit organization headquartered in West Palm Beach, Florida, offers a unique opportunity for scientists and filmmakers who require working on the water. The luxury research vessel ANGARI, captained by the foundation’s co-founder and president, Angela Rosenberg, is offered for charter at a minimal cost.
— Read on angari.org/nonprofit-supports-marine-science-and-unites-scientists-with-community/

100-pound Suwanee alligator snapping turtle

FWC documents 100-pound Suwanee alligator snapping turtle – ABC7 Southwest Florida

The fierce-looking turtles were found along the New River, a blackwater stream with low biological productivity, according to the FWC. They say finding species this large in such a small body of water is unusual.

— Read on abc-7.com/news/science/2020/08/21/fwc-documents-100-pound-suwanee-alligator-snapping-turtle/

Boogaali | The Ugandan Company that’s Making Affordable & Sustainable Bicycles Out of Bamboo

It’s in his workshop, in the capital city of Kampala, that young Ugandan entrepreneur Noordin Kasoma designs bicycles made from bamboo. His company, Boogaali Bicycles limited, produces bicycles that are, not only affordable but also sustainable.

In an industry dominated by steel and aluminium, the use of bamboo is not as bizarre as it might seem. Kasoma says his bikes are strong, light and durable. They are also comfortable, he says.

Boogaali-Bamboo Bikes

Boogaali-Bamboo Bikes

“The bamboo itself tries to absorb the shocks that you are passing through, better than steel or aluminium.”

Bamboo frames aren’t uncommon in the cycling world. Noordin’s bicycles, however, come with a Ugandan spin: the joints are reinforced with bark cloth, a traditional clothing material extracted from the inner bark of the Mutuba tree.

In addition to being hand-crafted, the Boogaali bamboo bicycles are customized according to the cyclist’s needs and specifications.

Biscayne Bay fish kill is a warning sign, researcher says

Researchers set out Wednesday to survey Biscayne Bay between the 79th Street and Julia Tuttle Causeways, where dead fish were seen bobbing along the surface.

FIU’s autonomous surface vessel surveys Biscayne Bay near Morningside Park.

“It is an emergency. The bay is not in a good place right now,” said Piero Gardinali, a chemistry professor who is director of the institute’s Freshwater Resources Division. “It’s a warning sign more than anything else. People have been predicting that things like this could happen. I think it’s time for us to sit at the table and say ‘OK, let’s do something about it.’”

Researchers believe fish were killed when the bay’s saltwater became so hot, it could no longer retain oxygen in the amounts necessary for marine life to thrive.

They are using an autonomous surface vehicle equipped with sensors to measure temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and chlorophyll, which can be an indicator for algae. What they find could provide more details on the health of the bay. The vessel allows researchers to collect more data over a larger area.

https://news.fiu.edu/2020/biscayne-bay-fish-kill-is-a-warning-sign-researcher-says?utm_source=tag&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=newsroom-referrals&utm_term=CREST%20Center%20for%20Aquatic%20Chemistry%20and%20the%20Environment